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Test Bank For A History of Modern Psychology 11th Edition by Duane P. Schultz, Sydney Ellen Schultz

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Test Bank For A History of Modern Psychology 11th Edition by Duane P. Schultz, Sydney Ellen Schultz

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A History of Modern Psychology 11th Edition by Duane P. Schultz, Sydney Ellen Schultz test bank

1. Describe the functionalist protest, including the definition of functionalism and the bases on which the functionalists objected to Wundt’s psychology and Titchener’s structuralism.1. Describe the functionalist protest, including the definition of functionalism and the bases on which the functionalists objected to Wundt’s psychology and Titchener’s structuralism.ANSWER:   Answer not provided.
POINTS:   1NOTES:   WWW

2. Making specific reference to material contained in your textbook, defend the following statement: “The suggestion that living things change with time, which is the fundamental notion of evolution, did not originate with Darwin.”ANSWER:   Answer not provided.
POINTS:   1

3. Explain evolutionary theory using the study of finches’ beaks.ANSWER:   Answer not provided.
POINTS:   1

4. In what specific ways did Darwin’s data and theory influence psychology in terms of both subject matter and methods?ANSWER:   Answer not provided.
POINTS:   1NOTES:   WWW

5. Summarize Galton’s contributions to psychology. Describe five examples of his influence that are familiar in contemporary psychology.ANSWER:   Answer not provided.
POINTS:   1

6. Describe/explain the role of Darwin’s work in the development of comparative psychology.ANSWER:   Answer not provided.
POINTS:   1

7. What were the major contributions of George Romanes and C. Lloyd Morgan to animal psychology and the development of functionalism?ANSWER:   Answer not provided.
POINTS:   1

8. The ____ ask, “What’s the mind made of?” whereas the ____ demand, “What does it do?”  a. experimentalists; structuralists
b. structuralists; functionalists
c. functionalists; behaviorists
d. functionalists; structuralists
e. Gestalt psychologists; functionalistsANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Functionalist Protest

9. Which of the of the following statements best summarizes the protest of functional psychology against Wundt and Titchener?  a. Functional psychology proposed that more mental elements exist than allowed by Wundt and Titchener.
b. Functional psychology emphasized that Wundt’s and Titchener’s approaches to psychology were too broad and included too many topics of study.  c. Functional psychology claimed that Wundt’s and Titchener’s approaches were too restrictive because they did not study the practical value of mental processes.  d. In contrast to Wundt and Titchener, functional psychology said that consciousness could not be studied scientifically.  e. None of the choices are correct.
ANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Functionalist Protest

10. Functionalism was an intentional protest of the limitations of ____.  a. Wundt’s structuralism
b. Wundt’s experimentalism
c. Titchener’s structuralism
d. James’s pragmatism
e. Wundt’s experimentalism and Titchener’s structuralismANSWER:   ePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Functionalist Protest

11. The most important consequence of functionalism was ____.  a. the introduction of evolution
b. the replacement of experimentalism
c. the status it gave to pragmatism
d. the development of applied psychology  e. the development of clinical psychologyANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Functionalist Protest

12. Which of the following works were most influential in the development of functionalism?  a. Weber’s and Fechner’s work in psychophysics
b. Quetelet’s and Galton’s work in statistics
c. Wundt’s and Titchener’s systems
d. The comparative research of physiologists and Darwin’s work  e. The work of Darwin and Galton and comparative research
ANSWER:   ePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Functionalist ProtestNOTES:   WWW

13. ____, a predecessor of Darwin, speculated that all mammals had evolved from a single filament and given movement by God.  a. Anaximander
b. Plato
c. Isaac Newton
d. Erasmus Darwin
e. Jean-Baptiste LamarckANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

14. ____ argued that our bodies adapt to the environment and those adaptations will be heritable.  a. La Mettrie
b. René Descartes
c. Charles Lyell
d. Erasmus Darwin
e. Jean-Baptiste LamarckANSWER:   ePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

15. ____ was an early evolutionary theorist who argued that acquired characteristics could be inherited.  a. Erasmus Darwin
b. Charles Darwin
c. Jean-Baptiste Lamarck  d. Bain
e. Charles Lyell
ANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

16. ____ was a confidant of Darwin who introduced the concept of evolution into geological theory.  a. Wilberforce
b. Huxley
c. Butler
d. Lyell
e. Galton
ANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

17. Why, after many centuries of accepting biblical stories, did scholars question the one about Noah’s ark?  a. No inland body of water would hold such a vessel.
b. Because the attitude of positivism allowed for no supernatural explanations.
c. The giraffe’s neck had become too long after generations of having to reach for higher and higher branches to find food.  d. Galton’s work in statistics showed that it was mathematically impossible.
e. There were too many identified species to fit two of each into a boat.
ANSWER:   ePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)NOTES:   WWW

18. What event(s) led common people to question whether humans were really unique creatures, totally unlike other species?  a. Many took cruises to South America and other places where they were exposed to species of apes very similar to human beings.  b. The tenet of natural selection became widely known and popular.
c. Displays of orangutans and chimpanzees became common in zoos, as well as fossil comparisons of gorilla and human skeletons.  d. Helmholtz’s and Fechner’s research findings made such questioning inevitable.
e. None of the choices are correct.
ANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

19. Darwin’s ideas of evolution were not new. What was new about Darwin’s work was his ____.  a. hard data to support such a theory  b. focus on lower animals
c. work on emotions
d. idea of natural selection
e. idea of survival of the fittest
ANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

20. When in England, Darwin displayed a wide variety of physical symptoms. These symptoms were probably ____.  a. caused by the muscular disorder he later died from
b. psychosomatic-neurotic in origin
c. faked
d. caused by over-exposure to lead in his drinking water  e. None of the choices are correct.
ANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

21. How many years did Darwin wait to present his theory publicly?  a. 2
b. 11
c. 17
d. 22
e. 34
ANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

22. A theory of evolution based on natural selection was developed independently by ____.  a. Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace
b. Charles Darwin and Charles Lyell
c. Joseph Hooker and Charles Darwin
d. Erasmus Darwin and Charles Darwin  e. Jean Lamarck and Charles Darwin
ANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

23. The essential difference between Wallace’s theory of evolution and Darwin’s was that the work of the former ____.  a. was a restatement of Lamarck’s ideas
b. was a restatement of Spencer’s ideas
c. did not have empirical data to support it
d. included the heritability of acquired traits  e. was suppressed by Darwin
ANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

24. ____ is the preeminent book of Darwin’s theory of evolution, which details the evolution of humans from lower forms of life.  a. On the Origin of Species
b. The Descent of Man
c. The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals
d. Hereditary Genius
e. Natural Inheritance
ANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

25. The most fundamental point of Darwin’s theses was the ____.  a. fact of variation among members of the species  b. heritability of variations
c. process of natural selection
d. tenet of survival of the fittest
e. normal distribution of traits in a population
ANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)NOTES:   WWW

26. Who predicted that humans in the future will live on the edge of starvation because the population of humans increases geometrically while the supply of food increases arithmetically?  a. Lamarck
b. Lyell
c. Huxley
d. Malthus
e. Hooker
ANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

27. Darwin’s position on Lamarck’s idea that changes due to experiences can be inherited was the ____ of Lamarck’s ____.  a. acceptance; doctrine
b. replacement; doctrine with the variability hypothesis
c. total rejection; doctrine
d. replacement; doctrine with the doctrine of social Darwinism
e. synthesis; ideas with Galton’s theory of the normal distributionANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

28. Who could be described as the driving force of England’s scientific establishment?  a. Lyell
b. Huxley
c. Hooker
d. Darwin
e. Wilberforce
ANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

29. Today, scientists are sometimes portrayed as offering science as a new religion or as being enemies of religion. This stance could be traced to ____.  a. Huxley
b. Hooker
c. Darwin  d. Lyell  e. WilberforceANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

30. In a public debate on evolution, ____ refuted the points made against evolution by ____.  a. Huxley; Hooker
b. Huxley; Lyell  c. Darwin; Fitzroy  d. Huxley; Wilberforce  e. Wilberforce; HuxleyANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

31. In his book ____, Darwin emphasized the similarity between human and animal mental processes.  a. The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals  b. The Ascent of Man  c. The Descent of Man  d. On the Origin of Species  e. The Phylogeny of ThoughtANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

32. In his book ____, Darwin explained human emotional gestures, postures, and other aspects of body language that convey emotion as remnants of adaptive movements by animals.  a. The Descent of Man
b. The Ascent of Man
c. The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals
d. A Biography of Emotions
e. Physiological Psychology
ANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

33. One of the early sources of modern child psychology was an article in 1877 by ____..  a. E. Darwin  b. C. Darwin  c. F. Galton  d. K. Pearson  e. J. M. CattellANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

34. In the study of finches’ beaks, the biologists Peter and Rosemary Grant found that ____.  a. Darwin had underestimated the power of natural selection  b. under drought conditions, more thick-than thin-beaked birds survived and reproduced  c. in only one generation, natural selection produced a better-adapted species  d. when heavy rains became common, birds with slender beaks flourished
e. All of the choices are correct.ANSWER:   ePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)NOTES:   WWW

35. In his journal Mind, Darwin describes ____.  a. the developmental stages of his son in relation to human evolution  b. an ape whose mental processes are analyzed  c. early theory that has since been the foundation of cognitive psychology  d. simple stimuli that elicit the same responses in humans and animals  e. the evolution of human mental functionsANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

36. The influence of Darwin’s work can be seen most directly in ____.  a. comparative psychology  b. functionalism  c. animal psychology  d. All of the above.  e. None of the above.ANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)NOTES:   WWW

37. A consequence of Darwin’s work for psychology was ____.  a. the legitimization of analog introspection in the study of animals  b. the legitimization of nonexperimental descriptive methods  c. the theory of eugenics  d. the use of the tenets of selective breeding for determining U.S. immigration quotas  e. acknowledgment of the necessity of statistical analysis in psychological researchANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)NOTES:   WWW

38. A consequence of Darwin’s work for psychology was ____.  a. the legitimization of the collective unconscious  b. work in comparative physiology  c. the theory of eugenics  d. a focus on individual differences  e. statistical analysesANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

39. In the Original Source Material from his autobiography, Charles Darwin described himself as ____.  a. having “no great quickness of apprehension or wit”
b. “a poor critic”
c. “moderate abilities”
d. possessing a “love of natural science [which] has been steady and ardent”  e. All of the choices are correct.
ANSWER:   ePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

40. Today, our acceptance that the study of individual differences is appropriate subject matter for psychology is due to whose work?  a. Quetelet  b. Helmholtz  c. Galton  d. Pearson  e. SpencerANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

41. Who wrote a 16th-century book on individual differences and argued that children’s education should be individualized to recognize such differences?  a. Butler
b. Huarte
c. Galton
d. Quetelet  e. Wundt
ANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

42. Who wrote Hereditary Genius?  a. Galton  b. Darwin  c. Cattell  d. Quetelet  e. HelmholtzANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

43. Galton’s Hereditary Genius was mainly concerned with ____.  a. exploring his lineage and the eminent men in his family  b. a statistical analysis of the concept of eminent men producing eminent offspring  c. isolating the gene responsible for making geniuses   d. None of the above.  e. All of the above.ANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

44. When Galton founded the science of eugenics, he ____.  a. was following in the footsteps of Huxley  b. invented the term “eugenics”  c. studied the incidence of behaviors in northern Europeans versus southern Europeans  d. became personally involved in aiding blood transfusions between Jews and Gentiles and between Africans and Caucasians  e. denounced the study of blood transfusions between rabbitsANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

45. The early 20th-century American government policy of sterilizing mentally retarded females is an example of ____.  a. artificial selection  b. eugenics  c. product-moment correlations  d. Darwin’s theory of evolution  e. natural selectionANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)NOTES:   WWW

46. Galton argued that what proportion of eminence could be reliably attributed to environmental influences?  a. 0%  b. 15%  c. 25%  d. 50%  e. 82%ANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

47. Which of the following did Galton not endorse in the material from Hereditary Genius?  a. the idea of natural equality  b. definite limits to muscular and intellectual powers  c. limiting one’s undertakings to matters within one’s reach  d. babies are born alike  e. None of the choices was endorsed by Galton.ANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

48. Who first highlighted the importance of central tendency?  a. Quetelet  b. Darwin  c. Galton  d. Pearson  e. CattellANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

49. Who was the first to show that biological and social data were normally distributed?  a. Galton  b. Quetelet  c. Pearson  d. Huarte  e. MoyenANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)NOTES:   WWW

50. Who arrived at the concept of the “average man” to describe findings from a large group of subjects?  a. Pearson  b. Quetelet  c. Huarte  d. Galton  e. CattellANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

51. The idea of measures clustering around the of center or average of a distribution should be attributed to ____.  a. Quetelet  b. Darwin  c. Newton  d. Pearson  e. CattellANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

52. Who was the first to show that human mental characteristics followed a normal distribution?  a. Pearson  b. Quetelet  c. Huarte  d. Galton  e. CattellANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)NOTES:   WWW

53. Galton proposed that measurement of human traits could be defined and summarized by two numbers, which are ____.  a. the mean and the median  b. the variance and the standard deviation  c. the median and the mode  d. the mean and the standard deviation  e. the mean and the modeANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

54. The formula currently used for calculating the correlation coefficient was developed by ____.  a. Galton  b. Thorndike  c. Cattell  d. Binet  e. PearsonANSWER:   ePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

55. The term mental tests was coined by ____, but ____ originated this concept.  a. Galton; Cattell  b. Cattell; Galton  c. Quetelet; Galton  d. Galton; Quetelet  e. Huarte; QueteletANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

56. Mental tests were originated by ____.  a. Binet  b. Simon  c. Morgan  d. Galton  e. RomanesANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

57. Galton’s measures of intellectual functioning assumed correlation between intelligence and ____.  a. acuteness of the senses  b. reaction times to stimuli  c. Fechner’s Law  d. average error in psychophysics tasks  e. just noticeable differencesANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

58. What had the greatest impact upon Galton’s view on the measurement of intelligence?  a. Descartes’ theory of innate ideas  b. Herbart’s argument that a threshold separates the conscious and unconscious mind  c. Wundt’s doctrine of creative synthesis  d. Berkeley’s mentalism  e. Locke’s theory that all knowledge comes through the sensesANSWER:   ePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

59. The aim of the research at the Anthropometric Laboratory was to assess ____.  a. developmental trends over the lifespan  b. the sensory capacities of humans  c. the collective mental resources of the British people  d. the correlates of intelligence among eminent men  e. eugenics policy developmentANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

60. What additional interest(s) did Galton research?  a. Arithmetic by smell  b. Paranoid disorders  c. The power of prayer  d. All of the above.  e. None of the above.ANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

61. Which of the following are influenced by Galton’s work?  a. child development  b. heredity
c. statistical techniques  d. testing methods  e. All of the above.ANSWER:   ePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

62. Galton found that a substantial proportion of word associations were evidence of ____.  a. rationalism as purported by Berkeley, Kant, and Descartes  b. empiricism as purported by Locke and Mill  c. Müller’s interference theory of memory  d. Ebbinghaus’s decay theory of memory  e. the effects of childhood experiences on the adultANSWER:   ePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)NOTES:   WWW

63. The first experimental attempt to study word associations was by ____.  a. Ebbinghaus  b. Galton  c. Wundt  d. Freud  e. JungANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

64. To study mental imagery, Galton used which self-report method?  a. introspection  b. retrospection  c. the questionnaire  d. projective tests  e. dream analysisANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

65. Galton studied paranoid disorders by ____.  a. visiting insane asylums  b. reading every book and article about it on which he could get his hands
c. imaging that every person or thing he saw was spying on him  d. inviting people suffering from paranoid disorders to the Anthropometric Laboratory  e. All of the choices are correct.ANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

66. In comparing evolutionary theory to theology, Galton’s concluded that ____.  a. there was insufficient evidence to support religious beliefs  b. there was insufficient evidence to support evolutionary theory  c. they were both correct  d. religious beliefs facilitated adaptation to environmental demands  e. there was insufficient evidence to support neither theology nor evolutionANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

67. According to ____, animals have no soul and thus are automata.  a. Descartes
b. Darwin
c. Galton
d. Romanes
e. Morgan
ANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of FunctionalismNOTES:   WWW

68. The notion that there is a continuity of consciousness and cognitive processes between animals and humans was suggested and/or demonstrated by ____.  a. Darwin’s evidence
b. Galton’s selective breeding notions  c. the structuralists
d. the functionalists
e. the behaviorists
ANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

69. According to Darwin, human emotional expressions reflect ____.  a. a similarity of nervous systems between people and animals
b. a correspondence of the “fight or flight” responses in humans and animals  c. the inheritance of animal responses that may not be adaptive for humans  d. evidence of animal intelligence
e. evidence of instincts in humans
ANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

70. Wundt’s early position on animal intelligence was that ____.  a. any sensory capacity at all allowed for judgment and drawing of conscious inferences
b. animals and humans differ only in the range of stimuli that they can detect
c. human’s erect stature makes smell and taste much less necessary than vision and audition for human adaptation to environments  d. people have language; animals do not
e. humans simply have more education than animals
ANSWER:   aPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

71. The first systematic study of animal intelligence was by ____.  a. Galvani
b. Huarte
c. Sherrington  d. Romanes
e. Morgan
ANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

72. The work of Romanes was especially flawed because of his ____.  a. assumption of a continuity of intelligence between animals and people  b. use of anthropometric methods
c. use of the anecdotal method
d. use of psychophysics methods
e. reliance on reaction times to sensory stimuli in humans and animals
ANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

73. Whenever we think we “know what’s on someone’s mind,” we are using which technique?  a. projection
b. the anecdotal method
c. introspection
d. introspection by analogy  e. identification
ANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

74. Despite Romanes’s deficiencies in methodology, he is respected by scientists for his ____.  a. reliance on experimentation
b. subjective interpretations
c. critical thinking regarding the inner workings of the animal mind  d. stimulation of the development of comparative psychology
e. phenomenological psychology
ANSWER:   dPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of FunctionalismNOTES:   WWW

75. The intent of Lloyd Morgan’s canon was to ____.  a. exclude anthropological findings from the natural sciences
b. make comparative psychology more scientific
c. make comparative psychology more behavioral
d. rid psychology of all traces of the technique of introspection
e. impose a criterion for a distinction between instincts and thinking in both animals and humansANSWER:   bPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

76. The first person(s) to engage in large studies of experimental comparative psychology was/were ____.  a. Conway
b. Romanes
c. Morgan
d. the functionalists  e. the behaviorists
ANSWER:   cPOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

77. Structuralism asked, “What does the mind do?” whereas functionalism asked, “How does it do it?”  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   FalsePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Functionalist ProtestNOTES:   WWW

78. The most important legacy of functionalism is applied psychology.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Functionalist Protest

79. A sturdy root of functional psychology is animal behavior research.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Functionalist Protest

80. The intellectual Zeitgeist of the 19th century was ready for Darwin’s theory, although the social Zeitgeist was not.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   FalsePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)NOTES:   WWW

81. A fundamental thesis of Darwin’s Origin was the principle of survival of the strongest.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   FalsePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

82. Observations made over the course of two decades in the Galapagos Islands indicate that evolutionary changes occur much faster than Darwin previously thought.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

83. Drastic environmental changes can drive evolutionary changes in animal forms to occur over decades rather than over millennia.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

84. Other than his theory of evolution, Darwin made no significant contributions to the field of psychology.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   FalsePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)NOTES:   WWW

85. Ironically, Darwin’s theory of evolution brought both consciousness and the study of animal behavior to the forefront of psychology.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

86. While expanding the scope of the subject matter of psychology, Darwin’s theory added emphasis to the notion that experimentation is the only method proper to the science of psychology.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   FalsePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

87. Quetelet was the first to apply statistical methods to the examination of individual differences.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

88. Galton gave us the correlational coefficient measure.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)NOTES:   WWW

89. Galton created the term “mental tests”.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   FalsePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

90. Galton’s basic assumption was that one’s sensory abilities directly reflect one’s intelligence.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

91. The quality of Galton’s research is verified by its reliability, as assessed as recently as 1985.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)NOTES:   WWW

92. The first experimental examination of associations was by Wundt and Ebbinghaus.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   FalsePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Individual Differences: Francis Galton (1822-1911)

93. Wundt argued that if an animal has any sensory ability, then it can make judgments and conscious inferences  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

94. Darwin selected G. J. Romanes to investigate the evolution of the mind.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

95. The first book on comparative psychology was Animal Intelligence by Romanes.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

96. Romanes’s anecdotal method used observational reports about animal behavior.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

97. When you say, ” I know what my dog is thinking,” you are practicing introspection by analogy.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

98. Lloyd Morgan’s Canon was an attempt to limit the tendency to attribute human cognitive processes and abilities to animals.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   TruePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

99. Romanes was the first scientist to conduct large-scale experimental studies in animal psychology.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   FalsePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

100. The initial work in comparative psychology was carried out in England and the leadership in the field stayed there for more than a decade.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   FalsePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

101. When psychologists began to examine mental processes in a completely different way than biologists studied anatomy, they laid the groundwork for functional psychology.  a. True  b. FalseANSWER:   FalsePOINTS:   1REFERENCES:   Animal Psychology and the Development of Functionalism

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[Solved] Test Bank For A History of Modern Psychology 11th Edition by Duane P. Schultz, Sydney Ellen Schultz

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Test Bank For A History of Modern Psychology 11th Edition by Duane P. Schultz, Sydney Ellen Schultz INSTANT DOWNLOAD What student Can You Expect From A Test Bank? A test bank will include the following questions: Description A History of Modern Psychology 11th Edition by Duane P. Schultz, Sydney Ellen Schultz test bank 1. Describe the functionalist protest, including the definition of functionalism and the bases on which the functionalists objected to Wundt’s psychology and Titchener’s structuralism.1. Describe the functionalist protest, including the definition of functionalism and the bases on which the functionalists objected to Wundt’s psychology and Titchener’s structuralism.ANSWER: Answer not provided. POINTS: 1NOTES: WWW 2. Making specific reference to material contained in your textbook, defend the following statement: “The suggestion that living things change with time, which is the fundamental notion of evolution, did not originate with Darwin.”ANSWER: Answer not provided. POINTS: 1 3. Explain evolutionary theory using the study of finches’ beaks.ANSWER: Answer not provided. POINTS: 1 4. In what specific ways did Darwin’s data and theory influence psychology in terms of both subject matter and methods?ANSWER: Answer not provided. POINTS: 1NOTES: WWW 5. Summarize Galton’s contributions to psychology. Describe five examples of his influence that are familiar in contemporary psychology.ANSWER: Answer not provided. POINTS: 1 6. Describe/explain the role of Darwin’s work in the development of comparative psychology.ANSWER: Answer not provided. POINTS: 1 7. What were the major contributions of George Romanes and C. Lloyd Morgan to animal psychology and the development of functionalism?ANSWER: Answer not provided. POINTS: 1 8. The ____ ask, “What’s the mind made of?” whereas the ____ demand, “What does it do?” a. experimentalists; structuralists b. structuralists; functionalists c. functionalists; behaviorists d. functionalists; structuralists e. Gestalt psychologists; functionalistsANSWER: bPOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Functionalist Protest 9. Which of the of the following statements best summarizes the protest of functional psychology against Wundt and Titchener? a. Functional psychology proposed that more mental elements exist than allowed by Wundt and Titchener. b. Functional psychology emphasized that Wundt’s and Titchener’s approaches to psychology were too broad and included too many topics of study. c. Functional psychology claimed that Wundt’s and Titchener’s approaches were too restrictive because they did not study the practical value of mental processes. d. In contrast to Wundt and Titchener, functional psychology said that consciousness could not be studied scientifically. e. None of the choices are correct. ANSWER: cPOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Functionalist Protest 10. Functionalism was an intentional protest of the limitations of ____. a. Wundt’s structuralism b. Wundt’s experimentalism c. Titchener’s structuralism d. James’s pragmatism e. Wundt’s experimentalism and Titchener’s structuralismANSWER: ePOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Functionalist Protest 11. The most important consequence of functionalism was ____. a. the introduction of evolution b. the replacement of experimentalism c. the status it gave to pragmatism d. the development of applied psychology e. the development of clinical psychologyANSWER: dPOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Functionalist Protest 12. Which of the following works were most influential in the development of functionalism? a. Weber’s and Fechner’s work in psychophysics b. Quetelet’s and Galton’s work in statistics c. Wundt’s and Titchener’s systems d. The comparative research of physiologists and Darwin’s work e. The work of Darwin and Galton and comparative research ANSWER: ePOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Functionalist ProtestNOTES: WWW 13. ____, a predecessor of Darwin, speculated that all mammals had evolved from a single filament and given movement by God. a. Anaximander b. Plato c. Isaac Newton d. Erasmus Darwin e. Jean-Baptiste LamarckANSWER: dPOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882) 14. ____ argued that our bodies adapt to the environment and those adaptations will be heritable. a. La Mettrie b. René Descartes c. Charles Lyell d. Erasmus Darwin e. Jean-Baptiste LamarckANSWER: ePOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882) 15. ____ was an early evolutionary theorist who argued that acquired characteristics could be inherited. a. Erasmus Darwin b. Charles Darwin c. Jean-Baptiste Lamarck d. Bain e. Charles Lyell ANSWER: cPOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882) 16. ____ was a confidant of Darwin who introduced the concept of evolution into geological theory. a. Wilberforce b. Huxley c. Butler d. Lyell e. Galton ANSWER: dPOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882) 17. Why, after many centuries of accepting biblical stories, did scholars question the one about Noah’s ark? a. No inland body of water would hold such a vessel. b. Because the attitude of positivism allowed for no supernatural explanations. c. The giraffe’s neck had become too long after generations of having to reach for higher and higher branches to find food. d. Galton’s work in statistics showed that it was mathematically impossible. e. There were too many identified species to fit two of each into a boat. ANSWER: ePOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882)NOTES: WWW 18. What event(s) led common people to question whether humans were really unique creatures, totally unlike other species? a. Many took cruises to South America and other places where they were exposed to species of apes very similar to human beings. b. The tenet of natural selection became widely known and popular. c. Displays of orangutans and chimpanzees became common in zoos, as well as fossil comparisons of gorilla and human skeletons. d. Helmholtz’s and Fechner’s research findings made such questioning inevitable. e. None of the choices are correct. ANSWER: cPOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882) 19. Darwin’s ideas of evolution were not new. What was new about Darwin’s work was his ____. a. hard data to support such a theory b. focus on lower animals c. work on emotions d. idea of natural selection e. idea of survival of the fittest ANSWER: aPOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882) 20. When in England, Darwin displayed a wide variety of physical symptoms. These symptoms were probably ____. a. caused by the muscular disorder he later died from b. psychosomatic-neurotic in origin c. faked d. caused by over-exposure to lead in his drinking water e. None of the choices are correct. ANSWER: bPOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882) 21. How many years did Darwin wait to present his theory publicly? a. 2 b. 11 c. 17 d. 22 e. 34 ANSWER: dPOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882) 22. A theory of evolution based on natural selection was developed independently by ____. a. Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace b. Charles Darwin and Charles Lyell c. Joseph Hooker and Charles Darwin d. Erasmus Darwin and Charles Darwin e. Jean Lamarck and Charles Darwin ANSWER: aPOINTS: 1REFERENCES: The Evolution Revolution: Charles Darwin (1809-1882) 23. The essential difference between Wallace’s theory of evolution and Darwin’s was that the work of the former ____. a. was a restatement of Lamarck’s ideas b. was a restatement of Spencer’s ideas c. did not h...
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