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Liberty University HIUS 221 Module Week 3 Mindtap Activities complete solutions correct answers key

 

Module 3: The Era of the American Revolution

4.2 Shifting Territorial Claims in North America

Indicate whether each statement about the conduct and outcome of the Seven Years' War is true or false.

Statement

True

False

British colonists heavily protested the 1763 Treaty of Paris.

 

 

Under the Treaty of Paris, France gained control of two islands in Central America and lost control of all of its territory in North America.

 

 

The Seven Years’ War was primarily a struggle between the British crown and the colonists living in North America.

 

 

Under the Treaty of Paris, Britain gained control over the French-speaking territory of Quebec.

 

 

 

Indicate whether each statement about the conduct and outcome of the Seven Years' War is true or false.

Statement

True

False

The Seven Years’ War was primarily a struggle over who would control land in North America.

 

 

France retained control of Quebec under the Treaty of Paris.

 

 

The main players in the Seven Years’ War were Britain, France, and Germany.

 

 

After the Treaty of Paris, Britain became the dominant European power in North America.

 

 

 

Imagine that you are doing library research in Boston and come across a letter written by a soldier at Fort Detroit to his mother around the time of the Seven Years’ War. Unfortunately, the ink is fading and the handwriting is difficult to read. Use the dropdown menus to complete the letter.

May 10, 1763

Dearest Mother,

I am writing to you in a grave state indeed. I do not wish to upset you, but I have been injured in battle and fear I may not find the strength to recover. The fighting has been fierce these last few days here at Fort Detroit. The Indians have been attacking relentlessly, led, they tell me, by an Ottawa chief named. They have thoroughly rejected our way of life, although it is vastly superior and more comfortable than theirs, and they now follow the traditionalist values of the prophet they call. To be honest, I am frightened. I hear the fighting is bad throughout Indian Country of the Appalachian Mountains.

Be safe. Thinking of you brings me great comfort and I will endeavor to be strong.

Your loving son,

Thomas

 

September 1, 1764

Dear Sir,

Regrettably, I have been unable to perform the necessary actions to fulfill my duties as a law enforcement officer here in Staunton. Despite the King’s proclamation, more and more people are passing through this way and across the on their way into in the Ohio Valley. They are mighty angry there, and many good people come back injured or carrying their dead. As we previously discussed, Staunton needs additional to assist with enforcement. Without delivery of that help, I am afraid I must resign my position of sheriff, effective immediately.

Sincerely,

Louis P. Buchanan

 

September 1, 1764

Dearest Sister,

I hope that life continues to be pleasant and quiet for you and Mother in Boston. It is hard to believe it has been nearly a year since they signed the Treaty of and the fighting. I am making my way across western Pennsylvania now and will soon cross the Appalachian Mountains to seek my fortunes in the unsettled land there. There are horrible stories of men returning home injured from attacks in that area, but I am confident I will subdue them with the gun father gave me before he passed and the prayers of you and our good mother. I will write again as soon as I am able. Pray for me, Rebecca.

Yours always,

Benjamin

 

Imagine that you are a foreign mapmaker who’s been asked by King George III to create a map of North America after the signing of the Treaty of Paris. Before you begin, you arrange a meeting with a surveyor to ask about the land, people, and shifting boundaries of North America before and after the Seven Years’ War. Use the dropdown menus to complete the conversation. (Hint: Click “Zoom” on the map to access the labels for colonies, settlements, and tribes.)

YOU: I hope you can provide some critical details about territorial claims in North America. Is it true that the Hudson Bay resided within the boundaries of Indian Country prior to 1763?

SURVEYOR: No, that is not true. The maintained their claim to the regions surrounding the Hudson Bay following the Treaty of Paris.

YOU: I stand corrected. Tell me, were there any other areas that they held before the Seven Years’ War that they also maintained afterward?

SURVEYOR: The east of the still belong to them. Beyond what they’ve maintained, they’ve gained a great deal more land than anyone else as a result of the treaty.

YOU: Which country relinquished the most territory as a result of the terms of the treaty?

SURVEYOR: The yielded all of their territory in North America, which dramatically reshaped the boundaries among the remaining European powers. Interestingly, the only borders that did not change immediately after the Treaty of Paris were those of.

YOU: Thank you very much, you’ve been most helpful.

 

YOU: I hope you can provide some critical details about the European designation of Indian Country in North America. First, I understand that the eastern portion of this territory is bordered by the. Is this correct?

SURVEYOR: It is. The  River briefly runs along this eastern border before turning west through the heart of Indian Country.

YOU: What can you tell me about the size of this territory now as a result of the Treaty of Paris? Has it expanded?

SURVEYOR: Indian Country before the war, but those who control the territories that border it have changed.

YOU: I’m aware of these changes for the most part, but I’m confused about who controls the area situated east of the southeast corner of Indian Country and west of the southern tip of the.

SURVEYOR: That stretch of land is now territory and is a point of contention between the Spanish and British.

YOU: Thank you very much, you’ve been most helpful.

 

4.1 Picturing History

Use the dropdown menus to complete the paragraph.

Mercantilism describes the policy that provided Great Britain a trade monopoly over its colonies. The basic laws governing this system were established with the. Under British mercantilist laws, raw materials were sent from the colonies to Great Britain, and in return Great Britain provided the colonies with manufactured goods, granted favored trading status within the empire, and offered

 

4.3 Colonial Responses to British Economic Policies

Use the dropdown menus to complete the following paragraph.

Supported by the Navigation Acts of the mid-seventeenth century, mercantilism survived between Britain and its colonies well into the eighteenth century. Britain took advantage of its sole rights with the thirteen colonies and attempted to control the smuggling of to other countries. Between the 1720s and 1760, the colonies experienced an economic boom, which caused Britain to its North American counterparts.

 

Since the mid-seventeenth century and through the Seven Years’ War, Britain upheld the system of mercantilism, which stated that parent nations enjoyed trading rights with their colonies. Despite the strict enforcement and restrictive features of the Molasses and Iron Acts, the wealth of the British colonies throughout the 1750s, chiefly because trade with the West Indies and southern Europe.

 

In the following timeline, put the acts in the order in which they were passed.

1764

1765

Stamp Act

1767

1773

Tea Act

1774

 

1764

Sugar Act

1765

 

1767

Townshend Revenue Act

1773

 

1774

 

Choose the act that best fits with its intended measure or its reaction in the colonies. (Hint: Events are not necessarily presented in chronological order.)

Result or Reaction in the Colonies

Act

Caused a shortage of money and pushed the colonies to the edge of an economic depression

 

Closed Boston Harbor, replaced elected court officials with crown-appointed persons, and allowed British troops to be housed in private buildings

 

Required all publications to bear a special seal and to pay the tax that came with it

 

Taxed all tea, glass, paper, lead, and paint in the colonies and required courts to issue search warrants to look for smuggled goods

 

 

Result or Reaction in the Colonies

Act

Required all publications to bear a special seal and to pay the tax that came with it

 

Was enacted to punish colonists for the Boston Tea Party

 

Led colonists to dump imported goods into Boston Harbor

 

Caused resentment among shipyard merchants about the paperwork and checks this act required

 

 

Why did the British Parliament’s passage of the Stamp Act of 1765 anger American colonists?

Their power to tax, which had been traditionally reserved for the colonial legislatures, had been assumed by Parliament and implemented without their consent.

American representatives in Parliament supported passage of the act.

Parliament forced the colonial legislatures to author the act that would later be passed in Parliament.

 

Which statement best describes the Stamp Act of 1765?

The act taxed colonists a certain amount of money per British soldier stationed in the colonies.

The act required colonists to pay a tax on all printed material, including legal documents and playing cards.

The act required colonists to place a tax on all stamps used for letters sent through the mail.

 

True or False: English leaders felt that the Stamp Act was just, for the colonies had benefitted from Britain’s victory in the French and Indian War.

False

True

 

4.5 Changing American Ideas and the Concept of Liberty

Use the dropdown menus to determine the significance of each event.

Event

Significance

Beginning in 1640, various legislatures establish petty school systems.

In 1687, Isaac Newton discovers his universal laws.

 

In 1690, John Locke publishes “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding.”

 

After 1720, newspapers become more available in America.

 

 

Determine whether each statement is true or false.

Statement

True

False

The Coercive Acts isolated port towns and reestablished the colonists’ obedience to the British government.

 

 

All thirteen colonies except Georgia sent delegates to the first Continental Congress.

 

 

Native Americans and African Americans joined the loyalists in attempting to subvert the Revolutionary governments.

 

 

 

Statement

True

False

To help build a greater militia, the Continental Congress increased the importation of slaves.

 

 

American revolutionaries called themselves Whigs.

 

 

Americans who continued to agree with traditional British rule called themselves loyalists.

 

 

 

Fill in the blanks to complete the following paragraph.

In the beginning of 1776, Thomas Paine published the, outlining the argument for independence from the British king. Support for this notion increased by spring of the same year, causing the Continental Congress to appoint a committee to draft.

 

5.2 The Common People

Select the statement that describes each group’s role or actions during the Revolutionary War.

Group

Statements

African Americans

 

Native Americans

 

Women

 

Loyalists

 

 

Select the statement that describes each group’s role or actions during the Revolutionary War.

Group

Statements

African Americans

 

Native Americans

 

Women

 

Tories

 

 

5.3 The War

Imagine that you find the diary of a soldier who served in the Continental army during the first few years of the Revolutionary War. Unfortunately, due to the age of the document, a few of the words are difficult to read. Select the correct response from each dropdown menu to complete the diary entry describing the early battles of the American Revolution.

April 19, 1777

Dear Diary,

I am weary from the last couple years of fighting but feel that the Continental army is steadily gaining the upper hand against the British forces. Since our first battles with the redcoats in, which took place two years ago this very day, our militias have developed into formidable fighting forces. Though the British defeated General Washington in two major battles in August and November of last year, which earned the invading army the support of local, the Continental army scored several important victories over this past winter that have given the redcoats pause. Washington’s bold attack on netted nine hundred prisoners and further emboldened him to successfully take Princeton just over a week later. I certainly hope this reversal of fortune persists so we can end this war and attain independence once and for all.

 

After which of the following decisive battles did France decide to sign the Treaty of Alliance?

The Battle of Fort Washington

The Battle of Saratoga

The Battle of Brooklyn Heights

 

Following the British defeat at Saratoga on October 17, 1777, Generals Sir Henry Clinton and Lord Charles Cornwallis initiated a new military strategy. General Clinton launched a vigorous campaign in the southern states in November 1778, bombing ports and attacking major strongholds throughout the region. The British made substantial progress in the South over the course of several years, but they ultimately lost the war in 1781.

Select the correct response from each dropdown menu to complete the timeline of the latter half of the Revolutionary War.

Dec. 29, 1778

British capture Savannah

Aug. 16, 1780

 

Jan. 17, 1781

 

October 1781

 

Though the events of October 1781 ended the fighting between the Americans and the British, which of the following formally brought the war to a close?

A provisional treaty signed one year later

The Jay-Gardoqui Treaty

The Treaty of Paris, signed in 1783

 

5.4 Point-Counterpoint: Social Lens

Identify each statement about General Gates’s letter as either true or false.

Statement

True

False

Gates speaks to Burgoyne in a respectful tone throughout the letter.

 

 

This letter provides no insight into the way in which American forces handled British prisoners.

 

 

This letter provides important historical context to understanding the Revolutionary War.

 

 

 

Statement

True

False

Gates speaks to Burgoyne in a dignified manner throughout the letter.

 

 

This letter provides no insight into the way in which revolutionary forces handled enemy prisoners.

 

 

Gates implicates Burgoyne in the murders of several settlers.

 

 

 

Statement

True

False

This letter provides no indication of the cordial relationship maintained between American and British generals.

 

 

Gates expresses his personal opinions on acts related to war.

 

 

Gates addresses Burgoyne in a courteous manner throughout the letter.

 

 

 

What is the purpose of Gates’s letter to Burgoyne? Check all that apply.

To extort money and supplies in exchange for the British soldiers being held prisoner

To demonstrate that the Americans conducted themselves more honorably than their British counterparts

To put Burgoyne on notice that the Americans would not let him get away with his crimes

Use the dropdown menus to complete the sentences.

 

Which of these statements about Gates’s letter are true? Check all that apply.

Gates presents himself and his troops as being more honorable than the British.

Gates believed that Burgoyne employed Indians to terrorize and kill European settlers.

The letter contains sufficient evidence to convince the reader of Burgoyne’s complicity in the murders of European settlers

 

According to the letter, which of the following are true? Check all that apply.

Native Americans under Burgoyne’s command are responsible for the deaths of more than a hundred innocents.

Gates captured several of the Indians with whom Burgoyne fostered an alliance.

Gates believed Burgoyne’s actions exceeded the bounds of acceptable warfare.

 

Based on the content of Gates’s letter, historians who is responsible for the murder of Jane McCrea. This source alone only provides the perspective on the events in question.

 

Based on the information presented in Gates’s letter, it is Burgoyne orchestrated the murders. Although it presents only one version of events, since Gates references Burgoyne’s own letter, it is easy to see

 

Identify each statement about Roger Lamb’s recollections as either true or false.

Statement

True

False

Lamb indicates that he holds the Americans in low esteem for misrepresenting the death of McCrea.

 

 

The narrative suggests that Native Americans instigated the murder of McCrea.

 

 

Lamb includes his opinions rather than just presenting factual information.

 

 

 

Identify each statement about Roger Lamb’s recollections as either true or false.

Statement

True

False

Lamb likely intended this narrative for an English rather than an American audience.

 

 

This document is an objective, balanced account of events.

 

 

Lamb believed that reports unfairly mischaracterized General Burgoyne.

 

 

 

Statement

True

False

In his narrative, Lamb considers the perspective of Native American leaders.

 

 

Although Lamb includes correspondence from both British and American generals, he does not offer a similar perspective from any Native American chiefs.

 

 

Lamb believes that Americans misrepresented the events surrounding McCrea’s murder.

 

 

 

Statement

True

False

Lamb likely intended his document to reach an American audience.

 

 

Gates’s document provides more than enough information for the reader to fully understand these events.

 

 

Lamb’s commentary greatly improves the reader’s understanding of the events he describes.

 

 

In order to fully understand the context of the situation, the reader would need more information than both sources provide.

 

 

Both sources portray Native Americans as simplistic savages who engage in wanton violence.

 

 

 

How did Burgoyne answer Gates’s charges against him? Check all that apply.

He said he offered the Indians payment for prisoners, not scalps.

He said the Indians were extremely cruel and acted on their own.

He said he had explicitly prohibited the Indian allies from taking “pledges of conquest” from any civilians.

 

What assertions does Lamb make in his narrative? Check all that apply.

Americans were truthfully reporting facts related to the conflict along with British involvement with Native American peoples.

General Gates was quick to believe reports of Burgoyne’s complicity in the Indian offensive.

General Burgoyne was not guilty of hiring Native Americans to attack and kill Jane McCrea.

 

Use the dropdown menus to complete the sentences.

In this document, Lamb indicated his own astonishment at the credence that had been given to reports of British-Indian alliances. In particular, he noted that since the land was so sparsely populated, Americans should have seen that the number of settlers reportedly killed was being. Lamb felt what he considered to be obvious rumormongers.

 

General Gates’s letter shows he believed that the reported butcherings and scalpings were . Gates thought Europeans would not hold Burgoyne accountable for the deaths of his own people because

 

Gates’s letter raises a number of questions despite providing a lot of information about conditions and sentiment during the Revolutionary War. Its tone is understandably, but without the benefit of, it is impossible to determine the complete circumstances surrounding the events described

 

Based on your careful reading of the two sources, identify each of the following statements as either true or false.

Statement

True

False

Lamb’s commentary greatly improves the reader’s understanding of the events he describes.

 

 

Gates’s document provides more than enough information for the reader to fully understand these events.

 

 

Both sources portray Native Americans as simplistic savages who engage in wanton violence.

 

 

In order to fully understand the context of the situation, the reader would need more information than both sources provide.

 

 

Lamb likely intended his document to reach an American audience.

 

 

 

Statement

True

False

For a more complete narrative of these events to become clear, the reader would need more information than both sources offer together.             

 

 

Both sources are a reflection of the personal beliefs and experiences of their writers.

 

 

Lamb’s commentary does little to help the reader better understand the events described in his document.

 

 

Gates’s document provides enough information for the reader to fully understand the events surrounding McCrea’s death.

 

 

Lamb likely intended his document to reach a British audience.

 

 

 

Although these sources are very similar in their content, what important idea does their content demonstrate?

Letters between political adversaries are not reliable sources of information.

Lamb and General Gates held very similar opinions about this event.

Incorporating varied perspectives can completely change our understanding of historical events or motivations.

 

Letters between military generals are not reliable sources of information.

Generals Burgoyne and Gates held very similar opinions and modes of operation.

How information is presented and what the writer chooses to include can completely change our understanding of a particular person or situation.

 

5.5 Diplomacy and Peace

Which statement best describes the experience of many Native Americans after the signing of the Treaty of Paris?

They were awarded land in the Mississippi River Valley.

They were provided with weapons to fight the Spanish.

They were treated as a conquered people and sometimes forced to relinquish their lands under threat.

 

What territory did the Treaty of Paris grant to the United States?

Parts of modern-day Canada

Land east of the Mississippi River

West Florida

 

Which of the following are examples of the diplomatic efforts involving the United States in its effort to alleviate threats to its growth and power? Check all that apply.

Secretary of War Henry Knox made it a policy that Native American lands were to be purchased and not forcefully taken.

The loyalist Mohawk leader Joseph Brant fought against white settlement in the Northwest.

Creek leader Alexander McGillivray offered protection to the Spanish in return for weapons.

Secretary of Foreign Affairs John Jay tried to open the lower Mississippi River to eastern merchants for trade.

 

Which statement best describes the experience of many Native Americans after the signing of the Treaty of Paris?

They were provided with weapons to fight the Spanish.

They were awarded land in the Mississippi River Valley.

They were treated as a conquered people and sometimes forced to relinquish their lands under threat.

 

What unexpected boundary challenges did the United States face during the 1780s following the Treaty of Paris? Check all that apply.

Barred access to the Great Lakes

Lack of transport across the Mississippi River

Prohibited travel within 25 miles of any Native American lands

Closure of the port of New Orleans

 

Prohibited travel within 25 miles of any Native American lands

Closure of the port of New Orleans

Barred access to the Great Lakes

Lack of transport across the Mississippi River

 

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HIUS 221 Module Week 3 Mindtap Activities complete solutions correct answers key
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Liberty University HIUS 221 Module Week 3 Mindtap Activities complete solutions correct answers key Module 3: The Era of the American Revolution 4.2 Shifting Territorial Claims in North America Indicate whether each statement about the conduct and outcome of the Seven Years' War is true or false. Statement True False British colonists heavily protested the 1763 Treaty of Paris. Under the Treaty of Paris, France gained control of two islands in Central America and lost control of all of its territory in North America. The Seven Years’ War was primarily a struggle between the British crown and the colonists living in North America. Under the Treaty of Paris, Britain gained control over the French-speaking territory of Quebec. Indicate whether each statement about the conduct and outcome of the Seven Years' War is true or false. Statement True False The Seven Years’ War was primarily a struggle over who would control land in North America. France retained control of Quebec under the Treaty of Paris. The main players in the Seven Years’ War were Britain, France, and Germany. After the Treaty of Paris, Britain became the dominant European power in North America. Imagine that you are doing library research in Boston and come across a letter written by a soldier at Fort Detroit to his mother around the time of the Seven Years’ War. Unfortunately, the ink is fading and the handwriting is difficult to read. Use the dropdown menus to complete the letter. May 10, 1763 Dearest Mother, I am writing to you in a grave state indeed. I do not wish to upset you, but I have been injured in battle and fear I may not find the strength to recover. The fighting has been fierce these last few days here at Fort Detroit. The Indians have been attacking relentlessly, led, they tell me, by an Ottawa chief named. They have thoroughly rejected our way of life, although it is vastly superior and more comfortable than theirs, and they now follow the traditionalist values of the prophet they call. To be honest, I am frightened. I hear the fighting is bad throughout Indian Country of the Appalachian Mountains. Be safe. Thinking of you brings me great comfort and I will endeavor to be strong. Your loving son, Thomas September 1, 1764 Dear Sir, Regrettably, I have been unable to perform the necessary actions to fulfill my duties as a law enforcement officer here in Staunton. Despite the King’s proclamation, more and more people are passing through this way and across the on their way into in the Ohio Valley. They are mighty angry there, and many good people come back injured or carrying their dead. As we previously discussed, Staunton needs additional to assist with enforcement. Without delivery of that help, I am afraid I must resign my position of sheriff, effective immediately. Sincerely, Louis P. Buchanan September 1, 1764 Dearest Sister, I hope that life continues to be pleasant and quiet for you and Mother in Boston. It is hard to believe it has been nearly a year since they signed the Treaty of and the fighting. I am making my way across western Pennsylvania now and will soon cross the Appalachian Mountains to seek my fortunes in the unsettled land there. There are horrible stories of men returning home injured from attacks in that area, but I am confident I will subdue them with the gun father gave me before he passed and the prayers of you and our good mother. I will write again as soon as I am able. Pray for me, Rebecca. Yours always, Benjamin Imagine that you are a foreign mapmaker who’s been asked by King George III to create a map of North America after the signing of the Treaty of Paris. Before you begin, you arrange a meeting with a surveyor to ask about the land, people, and shifting boundaries of North America before and after the Seven Years’ War. Use the dropdown menus to complete the conversation. (Hint: Click “Zoom” on the map to access the labels for colonies, settlements, and tribes.) YOU: I hope you can provide some critical details about territorial claims in North America. Is it true that the Hudson Bay resided within the boundaries of Indian Country prior to 1763? SURVEYOR: No, that is not true. The maintained their claim to the regions surrounding the Hudson Bay following the Treaty of Paris. YOU: I stand corrected. Tell me, were there any other areas that they held before the Seven Years’ War that they also maintained afterward? SURVEYOR: The east of the still belong to them. Beyond what they’ve maintained, they’ve gained a great deal more land than anyone else as a result of the treaty. YOU: Which country relinquished the most territory as a result of the terms of the treaty? SURVEYOR: The yielded all of their territory in North America, which dramatically reshaped the boundaries among the remaining European powers. Interestingly, the only borders that did not change immediately after the Treaty of Paris were those of. YOU: Thank you very much, you’ve been most helpful. YOU: I hope you can provide some critical details about the European designation of Indian Country in North America. First, I understand that the eastern portion of this territory is bordered by the. Is this correct? SURVEYOR: It is. The River briefly runs along this eastern border before turning west through the heart of Indian Country. YOU: What can you tell me about the size of this territory now as a result of the Treaty of Paris? Has it expanded? SURVEYOR: Indian Country before the war, but those who control the territories that border it have changed. YOU: I’m aware of these changes for the most part, but I’m confused about who controls the...

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