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Liberty University PHIL 201 quiz 2 complete solutions correct answers key
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Liberty University PHIL 201 quiz 2 complete solutions correct answers key

More than 13 different versions

 

Question 1

Propositions are evaluated according to their

Question 2

A onetoone comparison between two or more things is:

Question 3

It is possible for an argument to be valid and all the premises to be false.

Question 4

A mixed hypothetical syllogism in which the premise denies the consequent is called:

Question 5

The Latin phrase that means ‘it does not follow’ is:

Question 6

Identify the fallacy: The Bible says we should do to others what we would have them to do for us.

Therefore I have no problem sharing the questions and answers of this quiz with another student.

Question 7

The fallacy of equivocation occurs when the meaning of a significant term changes in the middle of an argument.

Question 8

This fallacy argues erroneously from the whole to each of the parts:

Question 9

This fallacy occurs when an argument is distorted to an extreme and becomes a false imitation of the original argument:

Question 10

Slippery slope and straw man are really doing the same thing, just in a different order.

Question 11

One way to resolve the problem of conflicting authorities is to:

Question 12

The term for beliefs relating together in a way that is mutually supportive:

Question 13

Ad Hoc refers to:

Question 14

The two great enemies of good arguments are:

Question 15

A best explanation approach is often the best way to argue because many issues in philosophy do not have perfect solutions.

Question 16

An argument where one gathers identical particular instances and arrives at a common conclusion:

Question 17

An argument may be evaluated as “true” or “false.”

Question 18

Type of argument that begins with a problem with an unknown explanation, forms a theory and tests the theory.

Question 19

If you have enough evidence you can be logically certain of a conclusion arrived at inductively.

Question 20

Identify this kind of argument: If naturalism is true, then all things are determined and there is no free will. If there is no free will then morality makes no sense. Therefore, if naturalism is true then morality makes no sense.

 

Question 1

3 out of 3 points

Which of the following statements are not true according to Hasker.

Question 2

3 out of 3 points

Some of the most important questions in metaphysics deal with:

Question 3

3 out of 3 points

According to Hasker, we can and should thoughtfully evaluate our worldviews.

Question 4

3 out of 3 points

Because not everything can be absolutely proven 100%, then truth is necessarily relative.

Question 5

3 out of 3 points

According to Hasker it is possible to establish some metaphysical beliefs to a point where they are beyond the possibility of challenge.

Question 6

3 out of 3 points

Compatibilism claims that determinism is logically compatible with freedom as defined by the libertarian.

Question 7

3 out of 3 points

The theory that says some actions are chosen and performed by the agent without their being any sufficient cause or condition prior to the action itself.

Question 8

3 out of 3 points

The libertarian concedes that some human actions may, in fact, be socially or psychologically determined, while the determinist does not allow for the possibility of any free human action.

Question 9

3 out of 3 points

The view that our choices are governed by whatever is our strongest motive in a given situation is called:

Question 10

3 out of 3 points

For Hasker, the experience of choice is, in itself, enough proof of the existence of free will.

Question 11

Which of the following statements is true about Behaviorism?

Question 12

3 out of 3 points

On the question of life after death, John Hick proposes a theory that involves total annihilation of the entire person, including the soul, at death.

Question 13

3 out of 3 points

Idealism tries to avoid the Mind-Body problem by reducing mental properties to physical properties.

Question 14

3 out of 3 points

Emergentism states that the mind is produced by the brain and therefore is identical with the brain.

Question 15

3 out of 3 points

Which of the following statements is true about philosophical Materialism?

Question 16

3 out of 3 points

Properties are similar to adjectives, whereas substances are similar to nouns.

Question 17

3 out of 3 points

The proposed solution to the mind/body problem that says that God preordained our mental states to correspond with the appropriate physical state.

Question 18

3 out of 3 points

The two types of substances are:

Question 19

3 out of 3 points

The kind of “relationship” that is the real problem behind the mind/body problem can be best characterized as:

Question 20

3 out of 3 points

Which of these is an example of an essential property?

 

Question 1

A mixed hypothetical syllogism in which the premise denies the consequent is called:

Question 2

The most common form of inductive reasoning is:

Question 3

If one agrees with the conclusion of an argument then it is a good argument.

Question 4

The first and perhaps most primary law of logic is:

Question 5

The Latin phrase that means ‘it does not follow’ is:

Question 6

This fallacy occurs when an argument is distorted to an extreme and becomes a false imitation of the original argument:

Question 7

A fallacy of ambiguity:

Question 8

“Begging the question” is a fallacy of presumption.

Question 9

The “fallacy of hypostatization” treats an abstract word like a concrete word.

Question 10

Identify the fallacy: Senator Newkirk’s arguments to increase federal spending for the military should be rejected. He is only arguing because he has several military bases in his state and is beginning his reelection campaign.

Question 11

One factor that strengthens a causal argument:

Question 12

The principle of simplicity says we should try to simplify complex arguments.

Question 13

Occam’s razor says:

Question 14

Plausibility is the aspect of a best explanation approach that

Question 15

Knowing the main point of the argument will help me find the conclusion.

Question 16

In a deductive syllogism, if the premises are true and the conclusion is true, then the argument is valid.

Question 17

Type of argument that begins with a problem with an unknown explanation, forms a theory and tests the theory.

Question 18

A sound deductive argument could be invalid.

Question 19

An argument may be evaluated as “true” or “false.”

Question 20

Identify this kind of argument: If naturalism is true, then all things are determined and there is no free will. If there is no free will then morality makes no sense. Therefore, if naturalism is true then morality makes no sense.

 

Question 1

According to the reading, even God cannot create a contradiction.

Question 2

The three parts of an argument are _____________, inference, and conclusion:

Question 3

Identify the following type of argument: If Frank goes to the store, then Ben will go to the library. Frank went to the store, so Ben went to the library:

Question 4

A onetoone comparison between two or more things is:

Question 5

The Latin phrase that means “it does not follow” is:

Question 6

“Begging the question” is a fallacy of presumption.

Question 7

This fallacy claims that if a position is popular then it must be right:

Question 8

The red herring fallacy:

Question 9

The fallacy of equivocation occurs when the meaning of a significant term changes in the middle of an argument.

Question 10

Knowing the main point of the argument will help me find the conclusion.

Question 11

Plausibility is the aspect of a best explanation approach that

Question 12

The explanation that can be understood with the least amount of effort, vagueness, and ambiguity has the best:

Question 13

The term for beliefs relating together in a way that is mutually supportive:

Question 14

One factor that strengthens a causal argument:

Question 15

Type of argument that begins with a problem with an unknown explanation, forms a theory and tests the theory.

Question 16

An analogy is an inductive argument.

Question 17

In a deductive syllogism, if the premises are true and the conclusion is true, then the argument is valid.

Question 18

The formal procedure for writing out a deductive argument is called

Question 19

An inductive argument is measured in degrees of probability:

Question 20

Consider this argument: “There are more churches in New York City than in any other city in the USA. New York City also has the highest amount of violent crime of any city in the USA. It’s pretty obvious that to relieve the crime problem we should reduce the churches.” Which informal fallacy is involved here?

 

Question 1

If one agrees with the conclusion of an argument then it is a good argument.

Question 2

Identify the following type of argument: If Frank goes to the store, then Ben will go to the library.

Frank went to the store, so Ben went to the library:

Question 3

In deductive reasoning, the argument is either valid or invalid.

Question 4

A onetoone comparison between two or more things is:

Question 5

The Latin phrase that means ‘it does not follow’ is:

Question 6

Identify the fallacy: The Bible says we should do to others what we would have them to do for us.

Therefore I have no problem sharing the questions and answers of this quiz with another student.

Question 7

This fallacy occurs when an argument is distorted to an extreme and becomes a false imitation of the original argument:

Question 8

“Begging the question” is a fallacy of presumption.

Question 9

This fallacy claims that if a position is popular then it must be right:

Question 10

A fallacy of ambiguity:

Question 11

The term that refers to a set of beliefs in which none of them contradicts the others:

Question 12

One way to resolve the problem of conflicting authorities is to:

Question 13

One factor that strengthens a causal argument:

Question 14

Occam’s razor says:

Question 15

Plausibility is the aspect of a best explanation approach that

Question 16

Type of argument that begins with a problem with an unknown explanation, forms a theory and tests the theory.

Question 17

A sound deductive argument could be invalid.

Question 18 In a deductive syllogism, if the premises are true and the conclusion is true, then the argument is valid.

Question 19

Identify this kind of argument: If naturalism is true, then all things are determined and there is no free will. If there is no free will then morality makes no sense. Therefore, if naturalism is true then morality makes no sense.

Question 20

Invalid deductive arguments are the same as inductive arguments.

 

·         Question 1

3 out of 3 points

Propositions are evaluated according to their

·         Question 2

3 out of 3 points

In a valid deductive argument the conclusion follows necessarily from the premises.

·         Question 3

3 out of 3 points

In deductive reasoning, the argument is either valid or invalid.

·         Question 4

3 out of 3 points

Identify the following type of syllogism: “All philosophers are good looking individuals. All good looking individuals are intelligent. Therefore all philosophers are intelligent.

·         Question 5

·         3 out of 3 points

The Latin phrase that means ‘it does not follow’ is:

·         Question 6

3 out of 3 points

Identify the fallacy: There are more churches in New York City than in any other city in the USA. New York City also has the highest amount of violent crime than any other city. It’s pretty obvious that to relieve the crime problem we should reduce the churches.

·         Question 7

3 out of 3 points

“Begging the question” is a fallacy of presumption.

·         Question 8

3 out of 3 points

A fallacy of relevance:

·         Question 9

3 out of 3 points

A fallacy of ambiguity:

·         Question 10

3 out of 3 points

A well-known fallacy that is usually the result of ambiguous grammatical construction is called:

·         Question 11

3 out of 3 points

Explanatory Scope refers to:

·         Question 12

3 out of 3 points

The principle of simplicity says we should try to simplify complex arguments.

·         Question 13

3 out of 3 points

Ad Hoc refers to:

·         Question 14

3 out of 3 points

One way to defeat an argument using an example is to respond with a counterexample.

·         Question 15

3 out of 3 points

Plausibility is the aspect of a best explanation approach that

·         Question 16

3 out of 3 points

An argument where one gathers identical particular instances and arrives at a common conclusion:

·         Question 17

3 out of 3 points

Type of argument that begins with a problem with an unknown explanation, forms a theory and tests the theory.

·         Question 18

3 out of 3 points

An argument may be evaluated as “true” or “false.”

·         Question 19

3 out of 3 points

An analogy is an inductive argument.

·         Question 20

3 out of 3 points

An inference drawn from statistical reasoning is deductive.

 

  • Question 1

3 out of 3 points

A mixed hypothetical syllogism in which the premise denies the consequent is called:

  • Question 2

3 out of 3 points

It is possible for an argument to be valid and all the premises to be false.

  • Question 3

3 out of 3 points

No inductive argument can arrive at a logically certain conclusion, i.e. in which the conclusion is necessarily true.

  • Question 4

3 out of 3 points

The “if” part of a hypothetical proposition is called the:

  • Question 5

3 out of 3 points

The most common form of inductive reasoning is:

  • Question 6

3 out of 3 points

The fallacy that applies a double standard without warrant is called:

  • Question 7

3 out of 3 points

The fallacy of equivocation occurs when the meaning of a significant term changes in the middle of an argument.

  • Question 8

3 out of 3 points

A fallacy of relevance:

  • Question 9

3 out of 3 points

The red herring fallacy:

  • Question 10

3 out of 3 points

Explanatory Scope refers to:

  • Question 11

3 out of 3 points

The two great enemies of good arguments are:

  • Question 12

3 out of 3 points

One way to resolve the problem of conflicting authorities is to:

  • Question 13

3 out of 3 points

Which of the following should we do first in our analysis of an argument's validity?

  • Question 14

3 out of 3 points

One way to defeat an argument using an example is to respond with a counterexample.

  • Question 15

3 out of 3 points

In a deductive syllogism, if the premises are true and the conclusion is true, then the argument is valid.

  • Question 16

3 out of 3 points

The formal procedure for writing out a deductive argument is called

  • Question 17

3 out of 3 points

An argument may be evaluated as “true” or “false.”

  • Question 18

3 out of 3 points

Invalid deductive arguments are the same as inductive arguments.

  • Question 19

3 out of 3 points

An analogy is an inductive argument.

  • Question 20

3 out of 3 points

Consider this argument: “There are more churches in New York City than in any other city in the USA. New York City also has the highest amount of violent crime of any city in the USA. It’s pretty obvious that to relieve the crime problem we should reduce the churches.” Which informal fallacy is involved here?

 

·         Question 1

3 out of 3 points

In a valid deductive argument the conclusion follows necessarily from the premises.

·         Question 2

3 out of 3 points

In deductive reasoning, the argument is either valid or invalid.

·         Question 3

3 out of 3 points

“Something is or is not” comes under the category of a law of logic:

·         Question 4

3 out of 3 points

It is possible for an argument to be valid and all the premises to be false.

·         Question 5

Needs Grading

The Latin phrase that means ‘it does not follow’ is:

·         Question 6

3 out of 3 points

This fallacy occurs when an argument is distorted to an extreme and becomes a false imitation of the original argument:

·         Question 7

 

A fallacy of relevance:

·         Question 8

1 out of 3 points

Identify the fallacy: There are more churches in New York City than in any other city in the USA. New York City also has the highest amount of violent crime than any other city. It’s pretty obvious that to relieve the crime problem we should reduce the churches.

·         Question 9

3 out of 3 points

This fallacy claims that if a position is popular then it must be right:

·         Question 10

3 out of 3 points

Identify the fallacy: The Bible says we should do to others what we would have them to do for us. Therefore I have no problem sharing the questions and answers of this quiz with another student.

·         Question 11

3 out of 3 points

One way to resolve the problem of conflicting authorities is to:

·         Question 12

3 out of 3 points

A positive/negative approach is the weakest approach to take in presenting an argument.

·         Question 13

3 out of 3 points

Knowing the main point of the argument will help me find the conclusion.

·         Question 14

3 out of 3 points

The term for beliefs relating together in a way that is mutually supportive:

·         Question 15

3 out of 3 points

Occam’s razor says:

·         Question 16

3 out of 3 points

In a deductive syllogism, if the premises are true and the conclusion is true, then the argument is valid.

·         Question 17

3 out of 3 points

An argument where one gathers identical particular instances and arrives at a common conclusion:

·         Question 18

3 out of 3 points

An argument may be evaluated as “true” or “false.”

·         Question 19

3 out of 3 points

Identify this kind of argument: If naturalism is true, then all things are determined and there is no free will. If there is no free will then morality makes no sense. Therefore, if naturalism is true then morality makes no sense.

·         Question 20

3 out of 3 points

An inductive argument is measured in degrees of probability:

 

Question 1 It is possible for an argument to be valid and all the premises to be false.

Question 2 A one­to­one comparison between two or more things is:

Question 3 We know that the laws of logic are self­evident and undeniable because

Question 4 In a valid deductive argument the conclusion follows necessarily from the premises.

Question 5 The Latin phrase that means ‘it does not follow’ is:

Question 6 This may be the most well­known fallacy of presumption:

Question 7 Identify the fallacy: He's the third student I've caught cheating on the test. It just proves that you can't trust students these days.

Question 8 The “fallacy of hypostatization” treats an abstract word like a concrete word.

Question 9 The red herring fallacy:

Question 10 The fallacy that applies a double standard without warrant is called:

Question 11 A positive/negative approach is the weakest approach to take in presenting an argument.

Question 12 The term for beliefs relating together in a way that is mutually supportive:

Question 13 The explanation that can be understood with the least amount of effort, vagueness, and ambiguity has the best:

Question 14 The principle of simplicity says we should try to simplify complex arguments.

Question 15 One factor that strengthens a causal argument:

Question 16 An inductive argument is measured in degrees of probability:

Question 17 A sound deductive argument could be invalid.

Question 18 In a deductive syllogism, if the premises are true and the conclusion is true, then the argument is valid.

Question 19 Type of argument that begins with a problem with an unknown explanation, forms a theory and tests the theory.

Question 20 Identify this kind of argument: If naturalism is true, then all things are determined and there is no free will. If there is no free will then morality makes no sense. Therefore, if naturalism is true then morality makes no sense.

 

Question 1 The most common form of inductive reasoning is:

Question 2 The first and perhaps most primary law of logic is:

Question 3 A one­to­one comparison between two or more things is:

Question 4 The “if” part of a hypothetical proposition is called the:

Question 5 The Latin phrase that means ‘it does not follow’ is:

Question 6 Identify the fallacy: He's the third student I've caught cheating on the test. It just proves that you can't trust students these days.

Question 7 One should avoid using emotional language in an argument as it usually distorts and misleads the argument.

Question 8 The fallacy of equivocation occurs when the meaning of a significant term changes in the middle of an argument.

Question 9 This fallacy is sometimes referred to as the false dilemma:

Question 10 If a fallacy doesn’t break a formal rule, but there is still something wrong with the reasoning, it is called:

Question 11 The principle of simplicity says we should try to simplify complex arguments.

Question 12 The two great enemies of good arguments are:

Question 13 Plausibility is the aspect of a best explanation approach that

Question 14 Knowing the main point of the argument will help me find the conclusion.

Question 15 A positive/negative approach is the weakest approach to take in presenting an argument.

Question 16 Type of argument that begins with a problem with an unknown explanation, forms a theory and tests the theory.

Question 17 In a deductive syllogism, if the premises are true and the conclusion is true, then the argument is valid.

Question 18 An inductive argument is measured in degrees of probability:

Question 19 An analogy is an inductive argument.

Question 20 An inference drawn from statistical reasoning is deductive.

 

Question 1 The “if” part of a hypothetical proposition is called the:

Question 2 In a valid deductive argument the conclusion follows necessarily from the premises.

Question 3 The law of excluded middle states

Question 4 If an argument is sound, it means

Question 5 The Latin phrase that means ‘it does not follow’ is:

Question 6 The red herring fallacy:

Question 7 A fallacy of relevance:

Question 8 The fallacy of equivocation occurs when the meaning of a significant term changes in the middle of an argument.

Question 9 The fallacy that applies a double standard without warrant is called:

Question 10 One should avoid using emotional language in an argument as it usually distorts and misleads the argument.

Question 11 The two great enemies of good arguments are:

Question 12 One way to defeat an argument using an example is to respond with a counterexample.

Question 13 The term that refers to a set of beliefs in which none of them contradicts the others:

Question 14 A best explanation approach is often the best way to argue because many issues in philosophy do not have perfect solutions.

Question 15 The principle of simplicity says we should try to simplify complex arguments.

Question 16 Type of argument that begins with a problem with an unknown explanation, forms a theory and tests the theory.

Question 17 An argument where one gathers identical particular instances and arrives at a common conclusion:

Question 18 An argument may be evaluated as “true” or “false.”

Question 19 Invalid deductive arguments are the same as inductive arguments.

Question 20 An inductive argument is measured in degrees of probability:

 

Question 1

We know that the laws of logic are self‑evident and undeniable because

Question 2

If an argument is sound, it means

Question 3

In a valid deductive argument the conclusion follows necessarily from the premises.

Question 4

The first and perhaps most primary law of logic is:

Question 5

According to the reading, even God cannot create a contradiction.

Question 6

The “fallacy of hypostatization” treats an abstract word like a concrete word .

Question 7

This fallacy occurs when an argument is distorted to an extreme and becomes a false

imitation of the original argument:

Question 8

This fallacy is sometimes referred to as the false dilemma:

Question 9

Identify the fallacy: Senator Newkirk’s arguments to increase federal spending for the

military should be rejected. He is only arguing because he has several military bases

in his state and is beginning his re‑election campaign.

Question 10

This fallacy claims that if a position is popular then it must be right:

Question 11

Explanatory Scope refers to :

Question 12

Which of the following should we do first in our analysis of an argument's validity?

Question 13

In the best explanation approach, illumination

Question 14

One factor that strengthens a causal argument:

Question 15

The term that refers to a set of beliefs in which none of them contradicts the others

Question 16

A sound deductive argument could be invalid.

Question 17

An analogy is an inductive argument.

Question 18

If you have enough evidence you can be logically certain of a conclusion arrived at

inductively.

Question 19

Invalid deductive arguments are the same as inductive arguments .

Question 20

The formal procedure for writing out a deductive argument is called

 

Question 1 The most common form of inductive reasoning is:

Question 2 A one­to­one comparison between two or more things is:

Question 3 It is possible for an argument to be valid and all the premises to be false.

Question 4 A mixed hypothetical syllogism in which the premise denies the consequent is called:

Question 5 The Latin phrase that means ‘it does not follow’ is:

Question 6 Identify the fallacy: He's the third student I've caught cheating on the test. It just proves that you can't trust students these days.

Question 7 “Begging the question” is a fallacy of presumption.

Question 8 Slippery slope and straw man are really doing the same thing, just in a different order.

Question 9 The “fallacy of hypostatization” treats an abstract word like a concrete word.

Question 10 The fallacy that applies a double standard without warrant is called:

Question 11 One way to resolve the problem of conflicting authorities is to:

Question 12 The two great enemies of good arguments are:

Question 13 Plausibility is the aspect of a best explanation approach that

Question 14 The principle of simplicity says we should try to simplify complex arguments.

Question 15 Which of the following should we do first in our analysis of the ‘validity’ of an argument?

Question 16 An analogy is an inductive argument.

Question 17 Invalid deductive arguments are the same as inductive arguments.

Question 18 An argument where one gathers identical particular instances and arrives at a common conclusion:

Question 19 The formal procedure for writing out a deductive argument is called

Question 20 Identify this kind of argument: If naturalism is true, then all things are determined and there is no free will. If there is no free will then morality makes no sense. Therefore, if naturalism is true then morality makes no sense.

 

 

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Liberty University PHIL 201 quiz 2 complete solutions correct answers key
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Liberty University PHIL 201 quiz 2 complete solutions correct answers key More than 13 different versions Question 1 Propositions are evaluated according to their Question 2 A onetoone comparison between two or more things is: Question 3 It is possible for an argument to be valid and all the premises to be false. Question 4 A mixed hypothetical syllogism in which the premise denies the consequent is called: Question 5 The Latin phrase that means ‘it does not follow’ is: Question 6 Identify the fallacy: The Bible says we should do to others what we would have them to do for us. Therefore I have no problem sharing the questions and answers of this quiz with another student. Question 7 The fallacy of equivocation occurs when the meaning of a significant term changes in the middle of an argument. Question 8 This fallacy argues erroneously from the whole to each of the parts: Question 9 This fallacy occurs when an argument is distorted to an extreme and becomes a false imitation of the original argument: Question 10 Slippery slope and straw man are really doing the same thing, just in a different order. Question 11 One way to resolve the problem of conflicting authorities is to: Question 12 The term for beliefs relating together in a way that is mutually supportive: Question 13 Ad Hoc refers to: Question 14 The two great enemies of good arguments are: Question 15 A best explanation approach is often the best way to argue because many issues in philosophy do not have perfect solutions. Question 16 An argument where one gathers identical particular instances and arrives at a common conclusion: Question 17 An argument may be evaluated as “true” or “false.” Question 18 Type of argument that begins with a problem with an unknown explanation, forms a theory and tests the theory. Question 19 If you have enough evidence you can be logically certain of a conclusion arrived at inductively. Question 20 Identify this kind of argument: If naturalism is true, then all things are determined and there is no free will. If there is no free will then morality makes no sense. Therefore, if naturalism is true then morality makes no sense. Question 1 3 out of 3 points Which of the following statements are not true according to Hasker. Question 2 3 out of 3 points Some of the most important questions in metaphysics deal with: Question 3 3 out of 3 points According to Hasker, we can and should thoughtfully evaluate our worldviews. Question 4 3 out of 3 points Because not everything can be absolutely proven 100%, then truth is necessarily relative. Question 5 3 out of 3 points According to Hasker it is possible to establish some metaphysical beliefs to a point where they are beyond the possibility of challenge. Question 6 3 out of 3 points Compatibilism claims that determinism is logically compatible with freedom as defined by the libertarian. Question 7 3 out of 3 points The theory that says some actions are chosen and performed by the agent without their being any sufficient cause or condition prior to the action itself. Question 8 3 out of 3 points The libertarian concedes that some human actions may, in fact, be socially or psychologically determined, while the determinist does not allow for the possibility of any free human action. Question 9 3 out of 3 points The view that our choices are governed by whatever is our strongest motive in a given situation is called: Question 10 3 out of 3 points For Hasker, the experience of choice is, in itself, enough proof of the existence of free will. Question 11 Which of the following statements is true about Behaviorism? Question 12 3 out of 3 points On the question of life after death, John Hick proposes a theory that involves total annihilation of the entire person, including the soul, at death. Question 13 3 out of 3 points Idealism tries to avoid the Mind-Body problem by reducing mental properties to physical properties. Question 14 3 out of 3 points Emergentism states that the mind is produced by the brain and therefore is identical with the brain. Question 15 3 out of 3 points Which of the following statements is true about philosophical Materialism? Question 16 3 out of 3 points Properties are similar to adjectives, whereas substances are similar to nouns. Question 17 3 out of 3 points The proposed solution to the mind/body problem that says that God preordained our mental states to correspond with the appropriate physical state. Question 18 3 out of 3 points The two types of substances are: Question 19 3 out of 3 points The kind of “relationship” that is the real problem behind the mind/body problem can be best characterized as: Question 20 3 out of 3 points Which of these is an example of an essential property? Question 1 A mixed hypothetical syllogism in which the premise denies the consequent is called: Question 2 The most common form of inductive reasoning is: Question 3 If one agrees with the conclusion of an argument then it is a good argument. Question 4 The first and perhaps most primary law of logic is: Question 5 The Latin phrase that means ‘it does not follow’ is: Question 6 This fallacy occurs when an argument is distorted to an extreme and becomes a false imitation of the original argument: Question 7 A fallacy of ambiguity: Question 8 “Begging the question” is a fallacy of presumption. Question 9 The “fallacy of hypostatization” treats an abstract word like a concrete word. Question 10 Identify the fallacy: Senator Newkirk’s arguments to increase federal spending for the military should be rejected. He is only arguing because he has several military bases in his state and is beginning his reelection campaign. Question 11 One factor that strengthens a causal argument: Question 12 The principle of simplicity says we should try to simplify complex arguments. Question 13 Occam’s razor says: Question 14 Plausibility is the aspect of a best explanation approach that Question 15 Knowing the main point of the argument will help me find the conclusion. Question 16 In a deductive syllogism, if the premises are true and the conclusion is true, then the argument is valid. Question 17 Type of argument that begins with a problem with an unknown explanation, forms a theory and tests the theory. Question 18 A sound deductive argument could be invalid. Question 19 An argument may be evaluated as “true” or “false.” Question 20 Identify this kind of argument: If naturalism is true, then all things are determined and there is no free will. If there is no free will then morality makes no sense. Therefore, if naturalism is true then morality makes no sense. Question 1 According to the reading, even God cannot create a contradiction. Question 2 The three parts of an argument are _____________, inference, and conclusion: Q...
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