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How do you analyze the poem "the road not taken"?
  • From English, Poetry
  • Due on 24 Apr, 2017 12:00:00
  • Asked On 24 Apr, 2017 09:48:55
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In preparation for the Poetry Essay and by completing your textbook readings, you will be equipped to objectively respond by compiling information from a variety of sources to compose a paper that allows you to write a persuasive analysis of a literary work; follow standard usage in English grammar and sentence structure; identify the theme and structure of each literary selection as well as the significant characteristics or elements of each genre studied; and evaluate the literary merit of a work (Syllabus MLOs: A, B, C, D, F, G and Module/Week 5 LOs: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7).

 

In Module/Week 5, you will write a 750-word (3–4 pages) essay that analyzes 1 poem from the Poetry Unit. Before you begin writing the essay, carefully read the guidelines for developing your paper topic that are given below. Review the Poetry Essay Grading Rubric to see how your submission will be graded. Gather all of your information, plan the direction of your essay, and organize your ideas by developing a 1-page thesis statement and outline for your essay as you did for your Fiction Essay. Format the thesis statement and the outline in a single Microsoft Word document using current MLA, APA, or Turabian style (whichever corresponds to your degree program). You are required to submit the thesis and outline by 11:59 p.m. (ET) on Monday of Module/Week 4 for instructor feedback.

 

The Poetry Essay is due by 11:59 p.m. (ET) on Monday of Module/Week 5 and must include, a title page (see the General Writing Requirements), a thesis/outline page, and the essay itself followed by a works cited/references/bibliography page of any primary and/or secondary texts cited in the essay.

 

Guidelines for Developing Your Paper Topic

 

Chapter 41 of the Kennedy and Gioia textbook (Chapter 43, pp. 1132–1142 in the eText) provides some helpful pointers for reading poems, taking notes, brainstorming, developing a clearly-defined thesis statement, preparing an outline, writing a cogent literary analysis of a poem, and citing your sources. This chapter specifically addresses Robert Frost’s “Design,” which is studied in this course, so be sure to read it before doing any further work for this assignment. Also, take notice of the example of a poetry thesis and outline on pp. 1344–1345 (pp. 1135–1136 in the eText).

 

Choose 1 of the poems from the list below to address in your essay:

  • The Lamb” or “The Tiger” or “The Chimney Sweeper” by William Blake;
  • “Batter my heart, three-personed God” or “Death Be Not Proud” by John Donne (watch the video lecture on John Donne’s “Batter my heart, three-personed God” for more ideas to help you write your essay on this poem);
  • “Journey of the Magi” by T. S. Eliot;
  • “God’s Grandeur” or “Pied Beauty” or “Spring” by Gerard Manley Hopkins;
  • “Ode on a Grecian Urn” or “Ode to a Nightingale” by John Keats;
  • “Ozymandias” by Percy Bysshe Shelley;
  • “My Last Duchess” by Robert Browning (watch the video lecture on Robert Browning’s “My Last Duchess” for more ideas to help you write your essay on this poem);
  • “Sailing to Byzantium” by William Butler Yeats;
  • “The Road Not Taken” or “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost;
  • “It Sifts from Leaden Sieves” or “There’s No Frigate Like A Book” by Emily Dickinson (Read Gilbert and Gubar’s “The Freedom of Emily Dickinson” for more ideas to help you write your essay on Dickinson’s poetry);
  • “Ulysses” by Alfred Lord Tennyson; and
  • “That Time of Year” (Sonnet 73) by William Shakespeare (watch the video lecture on William Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 73” for more ideas to help you write your essay on this poem).

 

Consider the following questions for the poem that you have chosen:

  • What is or are the theme(s) of the poem?
  • Is there a literal setting or situation in the poem? What lines from the poem tell the reader this information? What details does the author include?
  • Is the setting symbolic?
  • How would you describe the mood of the poem? What elements contribute to this mood?
  • Is the title significant to the poem’s content or meaning? How?
  • What major literary devices and figures of speech does the poet use to communicate the theme(s)?
  • How are rhyme and other metrical devices used in the poem? Do they support the poem’s overall meaning? Why or why not?
  • Is the identity of the poem’s narrator clear? How would you describe this person? What information, if any, does the author provide about him or her?
  • Does the narrator seem to have a certain opinion of or attitude about the poem’s subject matter? How can you tell?

 

NOTE: These questions are a means of getting your thoughts in order when you are collecting information for your essay. You do not need to include the answers to all of these questions in your essay; only include those answers that directly support your thesis statement.

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“Journey of the Magi” by T. S. Eliot;
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  • Submitted On 25 Apr, 2017 01:02:07
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“Journey of the Magi” Introdu...
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'the road not taken'
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  • Submitted On 25 Apr, 2017 02:52:27
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Two roads diverged in a yellow wood And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; 5 Then took the other, as just as fair And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that, the passing there Had worn them really about the same, 10 And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. 15 I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. 20 Summary The speaker stands in the woods, considering a fork in the road. Both ways are equally worn and equally overlaid with un-trodden leaves. The spea...
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“Journey of the Magi”
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“Journey of the Magi” Student’s Name Institution “Journey of the Magi” Introduction In “Journey of the Magi” by T.S Elliot, the poem’s major theme is of the Bible. The entire poem maintains a religious feeling. It alludes to the Three Wise Men who visited Jesus after He was born. Their journey is described in a realistic way and details the journey they made during the cold winter. “The ways deep and the weather sharp, the very dead of winter”. During their journey, they face a lot of suffering and hardships “…And the villages dirty and charging high prices: A hard time we had of it...” The hardships and suffering become a theme in the poem. The suffering is not only in form of bad weather but is also experienced in the lack of hospitality in the people. However, there is a bigger form of suffering which is psychological. It is due to the dying Magi culture and the mental and physical anguish we know the alluded Jesus will suffer later in life. “…We had evidence and no doubt. I had seen birth and death…” (Watson, 2013). The novel is partly addressing the issues of social, tribal, and religious acceptance. The speaker of the poem is able to reflect on the coming of Jesus which has been provided by own gods and other tribe effects and overtaking the coming Christ. The poem relates t...
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How do you analyze the poem A+
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  • Submitted On 25 Apr, 2017 02:37:45
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“Journey of the Magi” Introduction In “Journey of the Magi” by T.S Elliot, the poem’s major theme is of the Bible. The entire poem maintains a r...
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'the road not taken'
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  • Submitted On 27 Apr, 2017 06:12:23
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“The Road Not Taken” is one of Robert Frost’s most familiar and most popular poems. It is made up of four stanzas of five lines each, and each line has between eight and ten syllables in a roughly iambic rhythm; the lines in each stanza rhyme in an abaab pattern. The popularity of the poem is largely a result of the simplicity of its symbolism: The speaker must choose between diverging paths in a wood, and he sees that choice as a metaphor for choosing between different directions in life. Nevertheless, for such a seemingly simple poem, it has been subject to very different interpretations of how the speaker feels about his situation and how the reader is to view the speaker. In 196...
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literature analysis of the poem "the road not taken"
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  • Submitted On 02 May, 2017 04:19:44
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One of the attractions of the poem is its archetypal dilemma, one that we instantly recognize because each of us encounters it innumerable times, both literally and figuratively. Paths in the woods and forks in roads are ancient and deep-seated metaphors for the lifeline, its crises and decisions. Identical forks, in particular, symbolize for us the nexus of free will and fate: We are free to choose, but we do not really know beforehand what we are choosing between. Our route is, thus, determined by an accretion of choice and chance, and it is impossible to separate the two. This poem does not advise. It does not say, “When you come to a fork in the road, study the footprints and take the road less traveled by” (or eve...
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analysis of the poem"the road not taken"
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  • Submitted On 02 May, 2017 04:22:52
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This has got to be among the best-known, most-often-misunderstood poems on the planet. Several generations of careless readers have turned it into a piece of Hallmark happy-graduation-son, seize-the-future puffery. Cursed with a perfect marriage of form and content, arresting phrase wrought from simple words, and resonant metaphor, it seems as if “The Road Not Taken” gets memorized without really being read. For this it has died the cliché’s un-death of trivial immortality. But you yourself can resurrect it from zombie-hood by reading it—not with imagination, even, but simply with accuracy. Of the two roads the speaker says “the passing there / had worn them really about the same.” In fact, both roads “that morning lay / In leaves no step had trodden black.” Meaning: Neither of the roads is less traveled by. These are the facts; we cannot justifiably ignore the reverberations they send through the easy aphorisms of the last two stanzas. One of...
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