Cashback Offer from 28th to 31st July 2021. Get Flat 20% Cashback credited to your account for a minimum transaction of $50. Post Your Question Today!

Question Details Normal
$ 5.00

Unit 5 Discussion: Using Linux Log Files to Troubleshoot a System

Question posted by
Online Tutor Profile
request

Unit 5 Discussion: Using Linux Log Files to Troubleshoot a System

NOTE: PLEASE USE THE ADDITIONAL RESOURCES LINK BELOW TO ANWER THIS DISCUSSION

Linux operating systems generate and capture messages in log files for most of the elements of the operating system whenever there is a system event like a command is entered at the command line, or a daemons starts, and when any service runs. One of these new logs is called the journald.

The tasks of the administrator is to use these log files to determine why a service or process did not work correctly.

In your discussion post: make a list of different ways to use the log files in troubleshooting problems with a Linux system.

  • Visit several sites listed below and compile a list of five (5) methodologies that help troubleshoot a Linux system. Try to select different ways than that of your peers have not already posted.
  • Describe each of the five methods and provide a screenshot or description of each. You may need to search the public web using a search engine like Google or Bing to find screenshots of systems with different services. Cite any sources you use in APA format; this includes sources for any screenshots that are not your own.
  • When responding to your peers’ posts, describe your initial thoughts on the best advantage over the other systems’ services they posted. Note any major similarities or differences your notice between the different services.

 

Additional Resources

Logging the Ultimate Guide (Links to an external site.)

Troubleshooting Linux with syslog (Links to an external site.)

20 Linux Log Files (Links to an external site.)

Troubleshooting NFS (Links to an external site.)

You must respond to at least two (2) of your classmates. Ask questions to get the conversation moving. To further enhance the discussion, return to your original post throughout the week and respond to a few of the comments and questions raised by classmates and instructor.

If you do not know anything about the topics being discussed, research and come back to the board. Remember to provide proper APA citation for any resources you use and make sure to include the source links. Remember to proofread and spell check your discussion contributions before posting.

Available Answers
$ 5.00

[Solved] Using Linux Log Files to Troubleshoot a System

  • This Solution has been Purchased 2 time
  • Submitted On 08 Sep, 2016 02:00:53
Answer posted by
Online Tutor Profile
solution
• What Does the Logging? D(a)emons! Yes, the daemons do the logging. A daemon (literally, "a little demon") is a process that works in the background, not under the control of the user, responsible for performing many specific tasks, not only logging. Daemons have a "d" at the end of their names; for example sshd is actually a daemon that controls secure shell (ssh) connections. In our case, the two daemons that control the logging are syslogd and klogd. Linux systems have a ‘logrotate’ command that also runs in the background and prevents the logs from "inflation," that is, it renames the logs so that one log file does not become too big in size. To do that, it appends .1, .2, .3 to the end of the files so that you can see both “what is happening" and “what has happened". The larger the number, the older the log is. (See the screenshot on the left, which is my computer's /var/log directory. Note the .1.gz, .2.gz files.) We should all know how to check the system logs in our operating systems. System logs are the starting point for maintenance and troubleshooting, and Linux keeps track of everything for you. Here we discuss Linux troubleshooting via these system logs, what is where and how they help. • Introduction Linux logs everything starting from the system boot. You can see everything that happened on your system (if you are curious what happens in your system) and read the whole process line by line. You can use a text editor of your choice to read these logs - because they are text files - or you can go with the command line. Personally I wish to push users toward the use of the command line, but if you prefer the other way, you can open your text editor and go to File → Open to see the logs. • What Does the Logging? D(a)emons! Yes, the daemons do the logging. A daemon (literally, "a little demon") is a process that works in the background, not under the control of the user, responsible for performing many specific tasks, not only logging. Daemons have a "d" at the end of their names; for example sshd is actually a daemon that controls secure shell (ssh) connections. In our case, the two daemons that control the logging are syslogd and klogd. Linux systems have a ‘logrotate’ command that also runs in the background and prevents the logs from "inflation," that is, it renames the logs so that one log file does not become too big in size. To do that, it appends .1, .2, .3 to the end of the files so that you can see both “what is happening" and “what has happened". The larger the number, the older the log is. (See the screenshot on the left, which is my computer's /var/log directory. Note the .1.gz, .2.gz files.) • How Many Logs are There? Many. There are really many logs present in your system. The logs are kept for boot, kernel, http, mail, news, security, currently logged users to count a few. We will go through each one to see what it does and how does it help us. • Which Events are Logged? It depends on the configuration. The logging is configured in /etc/syslog.conf file. In this file, the events that are required to be logged are in the first field and the log files are in the second field. The first field consists of two different words that are separated with a full stop. The first word is "what application" is to be logged and the second word is the level of severity. We should all know how to check the system logs in our operating systems. System logs are the starting point for maintenance and troubleshooting, and Linux keeps track of everything for you. Here we discuss Linux troubleshooting via these system logs, what is where and how they help. • Introduction Linux logs everything starting from the system boot. You can see everything that happened on your system (if you are curious what happens in your system) and read the whole process line by line. You can use a text editor of your choice to read these logs - because they are text files - or you can go with the command line. Personally I wish to push users toward the use of the command line, but if you prefer the other way, you can open your text editor and go to File → Open to see the logs. • What Does the Logging? D(a)emons! Yes, the daemons do the logging. A daemon (literally, "a little demon") is a process that works in the background, not under the control of the user, responsible for performing many specific tasks, not only logging. Daemons have a "d" at the end of their names; for example sshd is actually a daemon that controls secure shell (ssh) connections. In our case, the two daemons that control the logging are syslogd and klogd. Linux systems have a ‘logrotate’ command that also runs in the background and prevents the logs from "inflation," that is, it renames the logs so that one log file does not become too big in size. To do that, it appends .1, .2, .3 to the end of the files so that you can see both “what is happening" and “what has happened". The larger the number, the older the log is. (See the screenshot on the left, which is my computer's /var/log directory. Note the .1.gz, .2.gz files.) • How Many Logs are There? Many. There are really many logs present in your system. The logs are kept for boot, kernel, http, mail, news, security, currently logged users to count a few. We will go through each one to see what it does and how does it help us. • Which Events are Logged? It depends on the configuration. The logging is configured in /etc/syslog.conf file. In this file, the events that are required to be logged are in the first field and the log files are in the second field. The fir...
Buy now to view the complete solution

The benefits of buying study notes from CourseMerit

Assurance Of Timely Delivery
We value your patience, and to ensure you always receive your homework help within the promised time, our dedicated team of tutors begins their work as soon as the request arrives.
Best Price In The Market
All the services that are available on our page cost only a nominal amount of money. In fact, the prices are lower than the industry standards. You can always expect value for money from us.
Uninterrupted 24/7 Support
Our customer support wing remains online 24x7 to provide you seamless assistance. Also, when you post a query or a request here, you can expect an immediate response from our side.
closebutton
Only 45 characters allowed.
closebutton

$ 629.35